Who does a speech pathologist work with?

Written by Brooke & Katrina


Certified Practicing Speech Pathologist
B.Sc, B.Sp.Path, C.P.S.P

Speech pathologists work to improve peoples’ communication or swallowing skills. But difficulties with communication or eating and drinking can affect many areas of life.

That means we work best with a whole team of people to support our clients and their families.

Collaboration between individuals, families, and a range of professionals can provide better outcomes by bringing multiple perspectives together (Bruce & Bashinki, 2017).

Open communication between people in a support team will help children or adults to flourish in all areas of life.

You may be wondering what other supports are out there for different areas of life. Here are some other professionals that speech pathologists often work with:

  • Occupational Therapist – OTs help to promote a person’s ability to fulfill their daily routines
    and roles
  • Psychologist – Mental health professionals who provide treatment or strategies to better
    cope with life, relationship issues, or mental health conditions.
  • Physiotherapist – Physiotherapists help to manage mobility, function, and well-being
    through physical rehabilitation, injury prevention, and health and fitness.
  • Teachers and teaching support
  • Kinder teachers and childcare workers
  • Paediatricians – medical specialists who provide care for babies, children and teenagers and
    can support with your child’s physical, mental and behavioural development.

If you are curious about how a speech pathologist could add to your team, or if you are curious about other supports available, please do not hesitate to contact our clinic.

You can contact Box Hill Speech Pathology on (03) 8658 8886 to book an appointment with one of our speech pathologists.

References:
Bruce, S. M., & Bashinski, S. M. (2017). The Trifocus Framework and Interprofessional Collaborative
Practice in Severe Disabilities. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 26(2), 162–180.
https://doi.org/10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0063

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.